Why you ought to go to your company Christmas party

The last time I was here, I was talking about NaNoWriMo and writing a novel. How’d that go, you ask? Ha! How many words did I write, you’re wondering? None. But my story really did make progress. Huge progress. Maybe by NaNoWriMo time next year, it’ll be ready to be put down on paper. Maybe it never will. Right now, it’s super enjoyable for me and I love that. It’s a definite possibility that I’ll decide to keep it all to myself forever.

Since the beginning of November, I’ve traveled to Las Vegas and back. I’ve been to a three-day conference, experienced my first tea festival, attended a communications course, the Vancouver Giants’ Star Wars nightanother Canucks game, an eight-session mindfulness series and an open house at one of my favourite integrative health centres.

Last night, we attended my company’s Christmas party. To be entirely honest, I was reluctant about going. I wasn’t totally into it. But, at the end of the day, I’d committed to going and, though I’d done it more out of obligation than desire, so had a few of my friends and I could look forward to seeing them. It was the traditional dinner and dance format and the food was okay (dessert included – though, the coffee was amazing.) We didn’t stay too late, but long enough to spend some time with people I like, have some great laughs and be seen.

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Here’s me and my friend, Jody. For as long as we have both been attending these Christmas parties, we’ve had our photo taken together in front of the tree. Cheers to another

Motivational moment: If you’re feeling like you don’t want to attend the holiday party, it might be worth going anyway. If you’re in deep need of self-care and some time alone, then don’t even think about changing your mind. But, if you’re just not into the politics of it or feel a little awkward corporate boxing with your boss and your boss’s boss, just take plunge. In my experience, office rules don’t really apply in the holiday party setting. Everyone is festive and happy and hugging and shaking hands. That can be very nice for a change, can help strengthen your relationships and maybe even see some of the people you have to work with in a new and different light.

Pro tip #1: Know who you want to hang out with before you get there. Having at least one person you know and like at your table or in your vicinity can help make things more enjoyable.

  • Don’t try to perfect the table. That takes years of honing and skill. Just make sure you and your +1 have one person or one couple to fraternize with.
  • This doesn’t give you an excuse to be an excluding jerk. Don’t alienate others by not letting them sit with you. Save one seat, maybe, but not all the seats.

Pro tip #2: Let loose. Have fun. Leave before too many drinks have been poured.

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